“Local Mission Market Tour,” December 2013

Event: American Institute of Architects Tour

Tour led by Seth Pare-Mayer of atelier KS, Yaron Milgrom & Jack DesVoignes, Co-Owners

"Join Seth Pare-Mayer - Atelier KS, Yaron Milgrom - Owner of Local Mission Market, and Jake DesVoignes - Chef & Co-Owner of Local Mission Market for a behind the scenes tour. Local Mission Market occupies an old industrial warehouse space in the Mission District of San Francisco. The new business incorporates a full commercial kitchen where nearly all of the offerings are made from scratch and minimally processed. The space was designed to be reminiscent of a traditional general store with updated, modern sensibilities. Warm wood and clean lines stand in contrast to the rough concrete shell of the building."

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“Local Mission Eatery: Promoting Community Through Food,” September 2011

Event: AIA SF - Architecture and the City Festival

Kelli Franz and Seth Pare-Mayer of atelier KS, Scheduled Speakers and Program Leads

"Local designers, artists, craftsmen, and builders sourced environmentally conscientious materials to create a space that highlights the unique characteristics of the evolving Mission neighborhood and showcases the restaurant's processes. Over an informal dinner, the designers and owners of Local Mission Eatery and Knead Patisserie will discuss design and food, as well as the impacts the two have had on the surrounding local community. Local Mission Eatery functions as part restaurant, part educational facility, with the goal of providing a welcoming environment for the community to learn about food, its origins and the process by which raw ingredients become a meal."

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“A look behind Local: Mission Eatery,” August 2011

Publication: SF Station

Featured Project: Local Mission Eatery

"September marks the 8th annual Architecture and the City Festival in San Francisco, a monthlong series of events featuring exhibitions, tours and lectures, all showcasing the wonderful history and budding future of architecture in San Francisco. Part of this year's festivities: a look at four restaurants and how design and food came together successfully.
One of the restaurants and design teams that will be featured is Local: Mission Eatery. Designers Seth Pare-Mayer and Kelli Franz with atelier KS have participated in the event in the past. Franz said that while much of the talk will focus on the history of the restaurant and how it came to be, they will also focus on how the entire process has a local feel to it.
"Through every single step of the process, our clients were trying to make intentional choices about what kind of materials to use, how it will affect the local economy and the community, how they can give back, how to integrate food education as part of a restaurant program," she said. "I think it's those type of features that make Local: Mission Eatery particularly interesting."
Pare-Mayer said the restaurant serves as a reflection of the neighborhood it is in.
"Yaron, the owner, lives in the neighborhood just a couple of blocks away. What he understood from the starting point of this project was that if it's not of the neighborhood and it's not accepted by the residents, his business will fail," he said. "And he wasn't terribly interested in changing the character of the neighborhood very much because he loved it as is."
With that in mind, Pare-Mayer and Franz set out in the community, talking to neighbors, working with local companies to get the tile and other building materials they were using and making Local: Mission Eatery every part of the community that it set out to be: an open environment for everyone to enjoy.
"The whole idea that Yaron was really adamant about is the transparency and honesty in food preparation and design," said Franz. "So we have a walk-in refrigerator with a huge panel of glass so you can see everything that they're storing back there. The chefs are all very visible so you can talk and ask questions. The openness of the restaurant was a design component that we worked on from the very beginning." -Link to full article.

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“San Francisco's Architecture and the City Festival,” August 2011

Venue: Slow Living Radio

Podcast: Architecture and the City Festival's Local Mission Eatery Event

Kelli Franz and Seth Pare-Mayer of atelier KS, Scheduled Speakers

To promote September's Architecture and the City Festival, Seth and Kelli were featured on Slow Living Radio, a weekly broadcast that aims to encourage people to slow down and fully appreciate life's many rewarding experiences. -Link to full article.

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"Local Mission Eatery: Restaurateur Yaron Milgrom builds an eatery
by the people for the people," April 2011

Publication: Fine Design, Dine, and Wine

Featured Project: Local Mission Eatery

"Restaurateur Yaron Milgrom doesn't just think locally. He thinks microlocally.
So when he opened a local foodstuffs restaurant a year ago, he put it in in his own backyard. Well, almost. Local Mission Eatery occupies the ground level of an old Victorian building on 24th Street, the cultural epicenter of San Francisco's eclectic and lively Mission District. Milgrom and his family live just four blocks away on 23rd.
The restaurant, which also houses a patisserie and a cookbook lending library and offers cooking classes, "was a way for me to be able to give something back to the neighborhood I love and plant roots here," Milgrom says.
Milgrom spearheaded a team of designers, contractors, artisans and artists - all from San Francisco's 415 area code - to bring his vision to life. Milgrom selected husband and wife designers Seth Pare-Mayer and Kelli Franz of atelier KS to create a space that was in sync with his beloved neighborhood.
The couple was aware that their design had to jibe with the ethos of the Mission, where a jumble of working-class Latinos, artists and white-collar professionals lives.
"It couldn't be a place out of Pacific Heights or the Marina or other areas of the city," says Pare-Mayer, referring to some of San Francisco's chicer neighborhoods.
He and Franz infused the impossibly rectangular space, a former old-time butcher shop, with their clean-lined, minimalist- modern sensibility. And they embraced Milgrom's microlocal philosophy.
In terms of both materials and fabricators, "we used sources that were very, very local," Franz says.
The restaurant's simple horizontal faŤade, for example, is covered in faded blue jean-colored subway tile from Sausalito's Heath Ceramics and wood planks that were crafted from a beam salvaged on site. The tile pays tribute to the neighborhood, which is characterized by its colorful, often Latin-themed, tiled buildings.
The blue tiles and salvaged wood reappear inside the restaurant crafted into tile-topped tables, which the designers paired with simple white plastic euro-style dining chairs. The tiles, which were found in Heath's overstock room, wound up dictating the restaurant's peaceful color palette of deep and soft blues.
Inside the sleek space, the main dining room's most eye-catching feature is its inventive 30-foot "art wall." The wall tops a neighborhood-fabricated steel counter, which is used for lunch seating during the day, and, with stools removed, as an informal waiting area during the evening. To create the wall, Mission artist Jon Fischer screen-printed images on wood tiles; the pictures depict the 24 intersections of 24th Street, from Valencia to Vermont. The decorative pieces were then placed into a larger grid of wood tiles.
The wood wall gives the room warmth, says Pare-Mayer. "We didn't want the art wall to make it feel like you were walking into the MoMA or the Getty."
No confusion there. For although the designers, who primarily work on residential projects, say it was unintended, the eatery evokes a really cool and comfortable California home. There are locally purchased plants spilling out of Woolly Pockets at the restaurant's entrance, and shelves accessorized with knickknacks near the patisserie at its very rear. And in between, across from the kitchen, are built-in bookcases that are neatly lined with Chef Jake Des Voignes' personal cookbooks.
Just like at home, some diners wind up eating on stools at the metal kitchen counter. Our group of six was seated at the large wood communal dining table, which faces the open kitchen. Chatting with friends old and new over bottles (and bottles) of organic California wines, I felt like I was at a really great dinner party hosted by a fabulous cook instead of at an urban eatery.
Adding to the home-like feel are two shabby chic chandeliers that hang over the communal dining table. Milgrom insisted on adding the retro lighting to the otherwise modern space.
"I wanted some elements to remind people that this building is 120 years old and has a history," says Milgrom, who uses vintage china for the restaurant's dishware as another historical reference. "It's exciting to be in a 120 year old building."
Indeed Yaron, particularly if that building is in your favorite neighborhood on Earth." -Link to full article.

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"Winner Announced! The Best-Designed Restaurant in SF"February 2011

Publication: California Home & Design

Featured Project: Local Mission Eatery

"We have just crowned the first winner of the best restaurant design in our monthly online feature: Design Democracy. More than 3,000 votes were cast for the 23 spots nominated for Best-Designed Restaurant in San Francisco, with Local Mission Eatery beating out the rest with 741 votes.
San Francisco's Atelier KS designed Local Mission Eatery with an eye to the surrounding buildings in its Mission District location. During the renovation of the site's original structure, a 100-plus-year-old Victorian, the design team, Kelli Franz and Seth Pare-Mayer, uncovered thick, Douglas fir floor joists and ceiling beams, which they repurposed to create window frames and a large, communal dining table. To support the restaurant/bakery/cookbook library's mission as a place to learn, not just eat, the walk-in cooler was fitted with windows that look out to the dining room.
Congrats to all that were nominated, and thanks so much to all our readers who participated."
-Link to full article.

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"Winner Announced! SF's Best-Designed Restaurant"February 2011

Publication: 7x7SF

Featured Project: Local Mission Eatery

"A couple of weeks ago, our sister mag California Home+Design queried local design-lovers on who they thought should be named SF's best- designed restaurant, and it was a heated battle with over 3,000 votes cast. The winner? Local: Mission Eatery.
San Francisco's Atelier KS designed Local: Mission Eatery with an eye to the surrounding buildings in its Mission District location. During the renovation of the site's original structure, a 100-plus-year-old Victorian, the design team, Kelli Franz and Seth Pare-Mayer, uncovered thick, Douglas fir floor joists and ceiling beams, which they repurposed to create window frames and a large, communal dining table. To support the restaurant/bakery/cookbook library's mission as a place to learn, not just eat, the walk-in cooler was fitted with windows that look out to the dining room." -Link to full article.

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"Open Restaurant - Local Mission Eatery"September 2010

Publication: The Architect's Newspaper

Featured Project: Local Mission Eatery

"San Francisco neighborhoods are famous for their eclectic variety of styles, histories, and energies. Taking full advantage of this is Atelier KS, designers of Local: Mission Eatery. Inserting the restaurant into the first floor of a 19th Century Victorian building and using a palette of salvaged historical materials, the craft of local artisans, and high tech new architectural products, they have created an astutely modern space.
The salvaged materials make sense in a restaurant that focuses on locally sourced foods. The storefront and a communal dining table inside feature salvaged Douglas fir found on site. Suspended wood ceilings were made out of material discovered during demolition. The restaurant's tiled wall was made from local artist John Fischer's screen prints pressed onto the wood of various local locations; and steel signage was made by local fabricator Matthew Granelli, with screen-printed wood inserts by Fischer.
For a touch of modern tech, the kitchen includes sleek zinc countertops, while a cantilevered shelving system is supported by custom steel straps." -Link to full article.

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"The Newest Places to Shop, Eat, and Stay - Smart Food"July-August 2010

Publication: California Home & Design

Featured Project: Local Mission Eatery

"San Francisco's atelier KS designed Local Mission Eatery with an eye to the surrounding buildings in its Mission District location. During the renovation of the site's original structure, a 100-plus-year-old Victorian, the design team - Kelli Franz and Seth Pare-Mayer - uncovered thick, Douglas fir floor joists and ceiling beams, which they repurposed to create window frames and a large, communal dining table. To support the restaurant/bakery/cookbook library's mission as a place to learn, not just eat, the walk-in cooler was fitted with windows that look out to the dining room."

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"Sunset District Remodel"May 2010

Publication: Interni & Decor

Featured Project: Sunset District Remodel

"Homes in San Francisco neighborhoods often have the same arrangement and design flaw: row houses with a single living floor over a deep ground floor garage. This leads to the common problem of wasted space. The garages are usually much too deep, becoming less useful storage areas instead of an opportunity to maximize living space. When the owners of this home contacted us, they asked that we reclaim part of their garage and turn it into living space. Our clients were looking for a versatile design that could perform a variety of functions, so the project became an exercise in fitting all the many programmatic requirements into a small area. The family wanted a living room with TV, a small office space with bookshelves, a bathroom with shower, laundry area, plenty of storage, a place for guests to sleep, and the ability to turn the space into an area where the teenage daughter could practice with her all-girl rock band. All in 500 square feet.
We decided early on that the best approach would be an open plan, with programmatic functions divided by built-in cabinetry and bookshelves instead of walls. The upstairs felt very constricted and dark due to a compartmentalized floor plan. We felt that an open plan with lots of natural light would counter any semblance of the former garage and the dark spaces upstairs. Our first inclination was to completely open up the rear wall of the garage and replace it with oversized sliding glass doors to maximize interior light. Once we realized that the cost implications for that plan were high, we had to figure out a new rear wall arrangement that worked with the existing structure of the building. We opened the rear wall up to the backyard with a large window and window seat, leaving part of the wall to become a library with walnut bookshelves adjacent to the window. A new glass door connects the interior space to the backyard, bringing more light into the new office area. Soffits were integrated into the design to hide existing structural beams running through the space. A new desk and built-in bookshelves were designed to wrap around an existing column. Working with the structure instead of changing it helped to reduce costs and aided to produce more thoughtful and creative solutions."

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"Three Buildings - atelier KS"March 2010

Publication: Dwell

Featured Project: Sunset District Remodel

"On dwell.com, we recently featured atelier KS's Sunset District Renovation-a disaster turned modern-design beauty that we loved. Now, we asked the designers behind the renovation, Kelli Franz and Seth Pare-Mayer, what constructions they most adore for the latest in our Three Buildings series.
1) Baiao Weekend House (Baiao, Portugal) by Eduardo Souto de Moura
The first is Eduardo Souto de Moura's weekend house in the remote northern town of Baiao, Portugal. We were introduced to this project early in our education and spent part of our honeymoon there. The region is known for its stone-terraced hillsides and port wine vineyards. The architect inserted a small house directly within a terrace adjacent to the stone ruin of an old house. The terrace appears to peel apart, revealing a discreet modern insertion within the earth itself, its glass sliding doors reflecting the river valley beyond. Within the house the spaces have been kept small and spare, focusing all attention to the framed view of the BestanŤa River joining the Douro River on its way to the Atlantic Ocean. The project is a very elegant and unassuming insertion to the landscape.
2) Maison de Verre (Paris, France) by Pierre Chareau
The second is Pierre Chareau's Maison de Verre in Paris. The intensely intricate nature of the building's detailing, coupled with a stunning glass-block facade and steel-framing system, make this unique within Paris's vast stock of housing units. Thanks in large part to Annie Dalsace's patronage of the arts, Pierre Chareau was given the freedom to elaborate on, and in some cases reinvent, common building systems (stairs, walls, window mechanisms, etc.). The recent book by Dominique Vellay, granddaughter of Annie and Jean Dalsace, puts a beautifully human touch to the machine-like building.
3) Thermal Bath Complex (Vals, Switzerland) by Peter Zumthor
Peter Zumthor's Thermal Bath Complex in Vals, Switzerland, is an intensely pleasurable architectural experience. This is a series of spaces that facilitate a sensory experience through water and bathing among rich textural walls of stone and concrete. The experience does not necessarily highlight the formal organization of spaces (we'd be hard-pressed to draw a floor plan of the complex). Instead you leave with the memory of watching snow fall on the Alps through an impossibly huge sheet of glass while resting in a chaise longue or of feeling snowflakes landing on your shoulders while wading in a warm pool.
-Link to full article.

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"Sunset District Remodel"February 2010

Publication: Dwell

Featured Project: Sunset District Remodel

"The residents of atelier KS's first renovation like stuff. When the couple, who lives in San Francisco's Sunset District, first invited the husband-wife design team to their home, the garage they wished to remodel was filled to the brim. "Our jaws just dropped open," Kelli Franz, the "K" of atelier KS, remembers. "We could hardly move in the space." Seth Pare-Mayer, Franz's personal and professional other half, says, "I wondered how we would measure the space." Still, the duo were able to transform the 1,000 square feet into a 500- square-foot garage and a 500-square-foot living space filled with all of the residents' wants: study, family room, guest bedroom, bathroom with a shower, laundry room, and storage space.
Homes in San Francisco's Sunset District, where this is located, are almost all two-story houses in which the first floor is a deep garage and the second floor is the living space. "We'd seen renovations in this area before and they always ended up as cave-like spaces," Pare-Mayer says. "We knew we had to do this renovation in a smart way." But first they had to get into the space.
The garage before renovation. "Our jaws just dropped open," Franz remembers. "The garage became a catchall for valuables and not-so- valuables." Pare-Mayer was worried that they could barely move in the garage, let alone measure it to develop plans.
Franz and Pare-Mayer left the front half of the garage as a car park and went to work on the rear 500-square-foot space. "The residents had a huge list of what they wanted to have: study, guest bedroom, family room, bathroom with a shower, laundry room, storage space, and so on," Franz says. "It was like a puzzle to fit in all these little pieces." Fit them in they did, however, with the study at the bottom of the stairs wrapping around to the family room, the storage and Murphy bed wall, and the laundry room and bathroom tucked behind the stairs.
To avoid creating a "cave-like space," the designers inserted a ten-foot-by-four-foot skylight into the ceiling above the stairs to the basement, added a large window to the back wall, and designed the space with an open plan in mind. Before the renovation, the only access to the backyard was through the garage, which was not an easy journey to make. Now stairs lead to the backdoor and act as a light well for the skylight above. Franz and Pare-Mayer also took advantage of the light from the skylight to brighten the bathroom: They inserted a pane of etched glass into the wall that separates the stairwell and the shower. Because of cost constraints, Franz and Pare- Mayer were unable to alter the existing structure, so they designed built-in furniture and cabinetry to define and differentiate the spaces. They hired Chris Allen, of San Luis Obispo-based CWA Studios, to fabricate the pieces. At the base of the stairs is the study, where the residents' teenage daughter often finishes her homework in an Eames Aluminum Side Chair from Design Within Reach.
Franz and Pare-Mayer originally planned to fill the rear wall with a single window, but they had to change course due to budget limitations. Instead they installed a glass door to the backyard and a single window to the right. "It ended up being way more interesting than a solid window wall," Franz says. The biggest challenge of this project was cleaning out the space, Franz says. The second was that this was atelier KS's first solo project. "Suddenly you're in charge of the project and you get to--and have to--make all the decisions," Pare-Mayer says. "The learning curve is very high." The designers were given the opportunity to make all of the furniture decisions for the space and chose the Girard Table, Paulistano Armchair, and Neo Sectional Chaise from Design Within Reach for the living room. The two folding chairs were garage-clean-up finds. Across from the sofa and recessed into the wall is the television and media center. Franz and Pare-Mayer had to fur out the walls to insulate the space and made them extra wide to ease the mechanical installations and allow for deep built-ins. The designers hired a carpenter friend to craft all of the built-ins and cabinetry. Behind the wood panels at the back of the living room is a Murphy bed. The residents' teenage daughter and her band practice in front of the panels and keep their equipment in the storage areas to either side of the fold-down bed behind it. Franz and Pare-Mayer finished the room with Paolo Rizzatto's 265 lamp from Flos and the AJ Floor Lamp and Yanagi Butterfly Stool from Design Within Reach. Franz and Pare- Mayer's carpenter paid painstaking attention to detail, aligning the wood grains from cabinet door to cabinet door (right). In the shower stall (left), the etched glass wall lets in light from the skylight above the stairwell (and though it's easy to see out to the stairwell, it's hard to see into the shower). The residents like the bathroom so much that they rarely shower in the bathroom on the main floor any more. Franz and Pare-Mayer have several residential and restaurant designs in the works. For more information about them and their projects, visit their site at atelier-ks.com." -Link to full article.

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Remodeling and Home Design